Itchy skin? Eczema? Try an Oat Bath!

 Oats for itchy skin and eczema. Photo by  Markus Spiske  on  Unsplash

Oats for itchy skin and eczema. Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

The ancient Greek and Latin literature mentioned oatmeal as a remedy for skin problems. Like many other herbal remedies, oats have been used for centuries in traditional medicine only to be re-discovered with modern science. Avenanthramides are anti-oxidants unique to oats; They have a profound anti-inflammatory and anti-itching effect and seem to be effective in the treatment of many ailments. Beta-glucan is another skin friendly anti-inflammatory compound found in oats that can improve eczema symptoms when applied onto the skin.

Oats have demonstrated health benefits ranging from improving cardiovascular health and promoting weight loss to soothing eczema and healing the gut. It seems that you can't go wrong adding some oats to your health and beauty regimen!

If you feel like eating a healthy snack check out our no sugar oat and banana biscuits. If you suffer from dry, itchy skin you may like to try an oat bath.

You will need:

  • 1-2 cups rolled oats

  • a muslin draw-string bag (if you don't have one you can tie the oats in a tea towel with a string or use a strainer to strain the oat liquid)

How to:

  1. Put oats into a drawstring bag or tie into a tea towel

  2. Place the bag in a large bowl and pour at least one litre of boiled water over it.

  3. Leave to soak and cool for about half an hour.

  4. When cool enough to handle, pour all oat water in your bath. Use the oat bag to cleanse and exfoliate your skin gently.

Tried it? Liked it? Let us know!

P.S.: If you like oats (and, by now, you must have noticed that we do) check out our Mindfulness soap bar. Goodness of oats with honey and chamomile - the perfect combination of soothing ingredients in a soap.

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30245775

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26654776

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28872611

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6126071/

Katerina Qabaha